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Special Edition Newsletter

February/March

American History Edition

In This Issue

Black History Month

Women's History Month
Arts in Education
The Negro National Anthem "Lift Every Voice and Sing!"
Black History Tributes

Great New Movies Spotlighting Black History

More Songs To Empower You

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Spirituals and Slavery: The Underground Railroad
and Harriet Tubman -  February 2014

A local story-teller and singer visited Dupont Elementary performing spirituals.
She also explained how slaves used the lyrics to communicate with each other on ways to escape their situations.


 Photo: I had such a glorious time celebrating the culmination of Black History Month with awesome Principal, Teachers and Students of Dupont Elementary.  Thank you, Principal Barbara Shepherd!

I had such a glorious time celebrating the culmination of Black History Month, through song and story, with awesome Principal, Teachers and Students of Dupont Elementary. Thank you, Principal Barbara Shepherd! ó with Barbara Shepherd.


Arts In Education  - January 2014

Click here to see video.

 

Arts Build Supporter, Tekelia Kelly! Click to hear video what arts build for !

Celebrating African-American/

Black History  

February 2012 Edition

 

"Empowering History, Hope, Purpose, and Prosperity"

 

Dear Friend,
 

This year's African-American/Black History newsletter focuses on the power of song; the role it has played in our past, and that it plays in our lives today. The right song can do wonders to help encourage, empower, enlighten, and equip!

 

Songs sang by the American Negro slave not only encouraged them while working, but also communicated messages of hope, as well as plans of escape.  Songs like "Go Down Moses" and "Wade in the Water" embedded hidden codes, signaling freedom-seeking slaves on how to use the "underground railroad".  Many songs sang during this time are commonly known today as Negro Spirituals. 

  

Another song that has done much to encourage and empower throughout the years is the "Negro National Anthem", commonly known as "Lift Every Voice and Sing".  This song is a great poem and inspirational hymn, eloquently written with lyrics that are meaningful and insightful.

  

"Lift Every Voice and Sing" tells the story of African-Americans' past: their journey, their ancestors' faith in God, and God's faithfulness to them and their children. Its words are thought-provoking, and help to portray the struggle and the blessing of being delivered from slavery to freedom.

 

Spoken and/or sung word is a powerful thing!  With words you have the power to speak life or death.  (Proverbs 18:21).  That is why it is important to know the words of songs, and whether they are life-elevating and life-enriching.

  

Songs like Lift Every Voice and Sing-- [written as a poem by James Weldon Johnson (1871-1938) and set to music by his brother John Rosamond Johnson (1873-1954) in 1900 (Wikipedia)], are empowering songs.  "Lift Every Voice and Sing"--is a song to remember, for life.

 

Click here to download your FREE! copy of "Lift Every Voice and Sing" and "Did You Know"  Black History Facts sheet.   

     
 

 

 

God bless you,

Tekelia C. Kelly

Tekelia C. Kelly,

Founder CEO, Publisher,

Sisters In Business.Net

Sisters In Business.Net

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


The Negro National Anthem: "Lift Every Voice and Sing!"

 

 

Pictured above Tekelia Kelly singing Negro National Anthem "Lift Every Voice And Sing" at Blue Cross Blue Shields Black History Month event, honoring the late Dr. Benjamin Hooks.

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:

 

"Lift Every Voice and Sing" ó often called "The Negro National Hymn", "The Negro National Anthem", "The Black National Anthem", or "The African-American National Anthem"ó is a song written as a poem by James Weldon Johnson (1871Ė1938) and set to music by his brother John Rosamond Johnson (1873Ė1954) in 1900.

History

"Lift Every Voice and Sing" was publicly performed first as a poem as part of a celebration of Lincoln's Birthday on February 12, 1900 by 500 school children at the segregated Stanton School. Its principal, James Weldon Johnson, wrote the words to introduce its honored guest Booker T. Washington. The poem was later set to music by Johnson's brother John in 1905. Singing this song quickly became a way for African Americans to demonstrate their patriotism and hope for the future. In calling for earth and heaven to "ring with the harmonies of Liberty," they could speak out subtly against racism and Jim Crow lawsóand especially the huge number of lynchings accompanying the rise of the Ku Klux Klan at the turn of the century. In 1919, the NAACP adopted the song as "The Negro National Anthem." By the 1920s, copies of "Lift Every Voice and Sing" could be found in black churches across the country, often pasted into the hymnals. In 1939, Augusta Savage received a commission from the World's Fair and created a 16-foot plaster sculpture called Lift Ev'ry Voice and Sing. Savage did not have any funds for a bronze cast, or even to move and store it, and it was destroyed by bulldozers at the close of the fair.[1]

During and after the American Civil Rights Movement, the song experienced a rebirth, and by the 1970s was often sung immediately after "The Star Spangled Banner" at public events and performances across the United States where the event had a significant African-American population

Lift Every Voice and Sing

Lyrics

The first verse is the one most commonly heard.

Lift every voice and sing, till earth and heaven ring,
Ring with the harmonies of liberty;
Let our rejoicing rise, high as the listíning skies,
Let it resound loud as the rolling sea.
Sing a song full of the faith
that the dark past has taught us,
Sing a song full of the hope
that the present has brought us;
Facing the rising sun of our new day begun,
Let us march on till victory is won.

Stony the road we trod, bitter the chastíning rod,
Felt in the days when hope unborn had died;
Yet with a steady beat, have not our weary feet,
Come to the place for which our fathers sighed?
We have come over a way
that with tears has been watered.
We have come, treading our path
throí the blood of the slaughtered,
Out from a gloomy past, till now we stand at last
Where the white gleam
of our bright star is cast.

God of our weary years, God of our silent tears,
Thou who has brought us thus far on the way;
Thou who hast by thy might, led us into the light,
Keep us forever in the path, we pray.
Lest our feet stray from the places
Our God where we met Thee,
Lest our hearts drunk with the wine of the world
we forget Thee;
Shadowed beneath Thy hand
May we forever stand,
True to our God,
True to our native land.

James Weldon Johnson

 


Celebrating African-American/Black History

 

 

Black History Month Tribute

 

 

 

 

"I don't want a black history month.  Black History is American History."

~Morgan Freeman

 

"When I found I had crossed that line [on her first escape from slavery, 1845], I looked at my hands to see if I was the same person. There was such glory over everything; the sun came like gold through the trees, over the fields, and I felt like I was in heaven."

~Harriet Tubman

 

 

http://www.sermonspice.com/search?q=black+history+month+tribute&x=0&y=0&topic=Sermon+Illustrations

 


Two Great New Movies Rich in African-American History:

THE HELP & RED TAILS


More Songs To Empower You

 

Amazing Grace History (A Must See!!!)

 

AMAZINGLY GREAT STORY that you simply must hear about "Negro Spirituals" and how they are the basis for a lot musicology, including white spirituals like "Amazing Grace".

 

I love the part about back during slavery "Black folk down South had more sense by accident than we do on purpose".  And gave the example "Son, if the mountain was smooth, then you couldn't climb it." 

 

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DMF_24cQqT0

 


 Hold to God's Unchanging Hand

  1. Time is filled with swift transition,
    Naught of earth unmoved can stand,
    Build your hopes on things eternal,
    Hold to Godís unchanging hand.
    • Refrain:
      Hold to Godís unchanging hand,
      Hold to Godís unchanging hand;
      Build your hopes on things eternal,
      Hold to Godís unchanging hand.
  2. Trust in Him who will not leave you,
    Whatsoever years may bring,
    If by earthly friends forsaken
    Still more closely to Him cling.
  3. Covet not this worldís vain riches
    That so rapidly decay,
    Seek to gain the heavínly treasures,
    They will never pass away.
  4. When your journey is completed,
    If to God you have been true,
    Fair and bright the home in glory
    Your enraptured soul will view.

My Hope Is Built On Nothing Less

1.                  My hope is built on nothing less
than Jesus' blood and righteousness.
I dare not trust the sweetest frame,
but wholly lean on Jesus' name.
Refrain:
On Christ the solid rock I stand,
all other ground is sinking sand;
all other ground is sinking sand.

2. When Darkness veils his lovely face,
I rest on his unchanging grace.
In every high and stormy gale,
my anchor holds within the veil.
(Refrain)

3. His oath, his covenant, his blood
supports me in the whelming flood.
When all around my soul gives way,
he then is all my hope and stay.
(Refrain)

4. When he shall come with trumpet sound,
O may I then in him be found!
Dressed in his righteousness alone,
faultless to stand before the throne!
(Refrain)
 


I Will Trust in the Lord

 

 

Verse 1          I will trust in the Lord.

                        I will trust in the Lord.

                        I will trust in the Lord until I dieó

                        I will trust in the Lord.

                        I will trust in the Lord.

                        I will trust in the Lord until I die.

 

Verse 2          Iím goiní to treat everybody right.

                        Iím goiní to treat everybody right.

Iím goiní to treat everybody right until I dieó

Iím goiní to treat everybody right.

Iím goiní to treat everybody right.

Iím goiní to treat everybody right until I die.

 

Verse 3          Iím goiní to stay on the battlefield.

(optional)      Iím goiní to stay on the battlefield.

Iím goiní to stay on the battlefield until I dieó

Iím goiní to stay on the battlefield.

Iím goiní to stay on the battlefield.

Iím goiní to stay on the battlefield until I die.

 

Verse 4          Iím goiní to stay on (a/my) bended knee.

(optional)      Iím goiní to stay on (a/my) bended knee.

                        Iím goiní to stay on (a/my) bended knee until I dieó

                        Iím goiní to stay on (a/my) bended knee.

Iím goiní to stay on (a/my) bended knee.

Iím goiní to stay on (a/my) bended knee until I die.

 

Verse 5          Iím goiní to watch, fight and pray.

                        Iím goiní to watch, fight and pray.

Iím goiní to watch, fight and pray until I dieó

Iím goiní to watch, fight and pray.

Iím goiní to watch, fight and pray.

Iím goiní to watch, fight and pray until I die.

 


Thank You!
 
Thank you for your viewership.  For more information visit us online at www.sistersinbusiness.net, or email us at sistersinbusiness@comcast.net,
 

 

Sincerely,

Tekelia Kelly
 
 

 

Sisters In Business.Net

P.O. Box 25548

Chattanooga, TN  37421

Visit us online at www.sistersinbusiness.net,

or email us at sistersinbusiness@comcast.net

 

 

 

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